• <center><b>Koller International Auctions<br>Books, Manuscripts & Autographs<br>23 September 2020</b>
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> Diderot, [Denis] - D'Alembert, [Jean Le Rond]. <i>Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers...</i> 17 text volumes, 4 supplement volumes, 11 plate volumes. €21,930 to €30,700.
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> [Philipon, Ch.]. <i>La Caricature,</i> Journal. No. 1-251 in 4 volumes. With 526 lithographs by H. Daumier, Grandville, A. Devéria, P. Gavarni, M. Delaporte, Adam, Raffet, Huot et al. €7,020 to €10,530.
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> Chagall, Marc. <i>Le Cirque</i>, Paris 1967. With 38 (of which 23 coloured and 3 double-page) original lithographs by M. Chagall. €61,400 to €78,950.
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> L'Isle, Guillaume de. <i>Atlas nouveau, contenant toutes les parties du monde.</i> [AND:] Sanson, Guillaume. <i>Inleidinge tot de geographie. 3 volumes.</i> €19,300 to €28,070.
    <center><b>Koller International Auctions<br>Books, Manuscripts & Autographs<br>23 September 2020</b>
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> Roberts, David. <i>The Holy Land, Syria, Idumea, Arabia, Egypt, & Nubia…</i> Lithographed by Louis Haghe. 6 parts in 6 volumes. 238 original lithographs and 2 engraved maps. €19,300 to €28,070.
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> Berlèse, Lorenzo and Johann Jakob Jung. <i>Iconographie du genre camellia ou description et figures des camellia les plus beaux et les plus rares.</i> 3 volumes. With 301 coloured engraved plates. €17,540 to €21,930.
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> Merian, Maria Sybilla. <i>Over de voortteeling en wonderbaerlyke veranderingen der Surinaamsche insecten...</i> With engraved frontispiece, title vignette and 72 copperplates. €17,540 to €26,320.
    <b>Koller Auctions, Sep. 23:</b> Burckhardt, Johann Ludwig, Explorer. Collection of 24 handwritten letters from his youth and student days to his eldest (step) brother, Johann Burckhardt-Gemuseus and his wife Anna Elisabeth. €2,630 to €4,390.
  • <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on Paper<br>25 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Chagall (Marc). <i>Cirque,</i> one of 270 copies on Arches signed by the artist, 38 lithographs, 23 colour, Paris, Tériade Éditeur, 1967. £100,000 to £150,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Sangorski (Alberto).- Poe (Edgar Allan). <i>Annabel Lee and Other Poems,</i> illuminated manuscript in gold and colours, bound in turquoise morocco tooled in gilt and inlaid with 35 jewels, [c.1928]. £50,000 to £70,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Darwin (Charles) and Alfred R. Wallace. “On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties...,” contained in <i>Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society,</i> 1859. £12,000 to £18,000.
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on Paper<br>25 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Ornament.- Basque metalwork.- Zuloaga (Eusebio) and Workshop. Collection of twenty-three original ornament designs for damascening, [19th century]. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Arms and Armour.- Rugendas.- <i>Der Harnisch Von Seinem Entstehen Bis Zu Seinem Wiedervergehen In Bildern Dargestelt Und Gezeichnet,</i> [1714 and later]. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Webster (John). <i>A Monumental Columne, erected to the liuing memory of the euer-glorious Henry, late Prince of Wales,</i> rare first edition, Printed by N[icholas]. O[kes]. for William Welby, 1613. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on Paper<br>25 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Donne (John). <i>Poems, by J.D. with elegies on the Authors Death,</i> first edition, Printed by M[iles]. F[lesher]. for Iohn Marriot, 1633. £6,000 to £8,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Brangwyn (Frank). <i>Venice,</i> oil on canvas, [c. 1908]. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Sewell (Anna). <i>Black Beauty: his Grooms and Companions. The Autobiography of a Horse,</i> first edition, original cloth, [1877]. £3,000 to £4,000.
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>Fine Books, Manuscripts<br>and Works on Paper<br>25 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Gray (John Edward). <i>Gleanings from the Knowsley Menagerie and Aviary at Knowsley Hall,</i> first edition, one of c.100 copies privately printed for the author, 1850. £3,000 to £4,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> George III (King). Warrant signed "George R" for the payment of £60,634 granted for the North American Provinces to the Province of Massachusetts Bay, D.s., manuscript, [c. 1761-62]. £2,000 to £2,500.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 25:</b> Mecca, Medina & Damascus.- 2 manuscript plans of Mecca and El Medinah and a map of Damascus, 3 detailed pen and ink drawings with 3pp. of manuscript notes, [late 19th century]. £1,000 to £1,500.
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> John Richard, sketchbook kept by soldier-artist during last months of Civil War, 55 drawings, 1865. $25,000 to $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> Guest register for Catskill Mountain House, with signatures of many notable guests, 1839-43, 1846-52. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> Manuscript confirmation of arms & nobility, Esquivel y Vargas family, Salvatierra, Guanajuato, Mexico, 1731. $5,000 to $7,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> Elizabeth Shoumatoff, 3 watercolor studies for famous “Unfinished Portrait” of FDR, 1945. $40,000 to $60,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b><br><i>Sa Ga Yean Qua Rash Tow, Coning Vande Maquas alias Coning Brant,</i> engraving by Pieter Schenck, Netherlands, c.1710s. $3,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> Stamp from the Stamp Act of 1765, embossed, “II Shillings VI Pence.” $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b><br><i>The Law of God,</i> five volumes, first edition, first Jewish translation of the Pentateuch into English, 1845-46. $6,000 to $9,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> Diary of James W. Bentley, a cavalry officer protecting settlers on the Overland Trail, 1865. $15,000 to $25,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries Sep 24:</b> Pedro de Arenas, <i>Vocabulario manual de las lenguas castellana y mexicana,</i> complete first edition, Mexico, 1611. $12,000 to $18,000.
  • <center><b>Leland Little Auctions<br>The Important Fall Auction<br>September 19, 2020</b>
    <b>Leland Little, Sep. 19:</b> <i>Bull City Summer Portfolio</i> (Complete Portfolio of 15 Photographs by Alec Soth, Hank Willis Thomas, and Hiroshi Watanabe). $8,000 to $12,000.
    <b>Leland Little, Sep. 19:</b> Krishna Reddy (Indian, 1925-2018), <i>Three Graces.</i> Mixed color intaglio print on paper, 1958, pencil signed. $2,000 to $4,000.
    <b>Leland Little, Sep. 19:</b> after Georges Braque (French, 1882–1963), <i>Hommage à J. S. Bach.</i> Etching and aquatint in colors, 1950, pencil signed and numbered 277/300. $2,000 to $4,000.
    <center><b>Leland Little Auctions<br>The Important Fall Auction<br>September 19, 2020</b>
    <b>Leland Little, Sep. 19:</b> Heller, Joseph. <i>Catch-22,</i> First Edition (New York Simon & Schuster, Inc., 1961). $500 to $1,000.
    <b>Leland Little, Sep. 19:</b> Rey, Margaret & H. A. <i>Curious George Goes to the Hospital,</i> First Edition. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1966). $500 to $1,000.
    <b>Leland Little, Sep. 19:</b> Large 1754 Map of St. Croix, Dutch West Indies by Jens Michelsen Beck. Sheet 21.25 x 31.75 in.; DOA 31.25 x 41.25 in. $300 to $600.

Rare Book Monthly

Articles - December - 2014 Issue

Memories of the Dealer’s Daughter - Bookselling as it was in the 1960s

0b81e978-7905-4675-89e8-572154710241

Cover of a 1950s Cellar Book Shop catalog with art by Romeo Tabuena.

My parents had not yet entered the bookselling trade in 1943 the year I was born in Detroit, but all the early warnings signs were there. From the time I was a little girl my father and I would go out most weekends and come home with boxes and bags of books.

 

We often frequented Goodwill Industries. While I rode up and down in an antique elevator operated by a man with a fascinating hook in place of a hand, my dad labored in the second or third sub-basement in a room lit by a single light bulb dangling from the ceiling. In the dim light he was a tiny figure with books piled high on every side. He never went home empty-handed and Lord knows how we got them on the street car.

 

By the 1950s my parents moved to Massapequa, a town set in the potato fields of Long Island. During the day my father worked at the US Rubber Company. But almost every other waking moment was devoted to acquiring books, particularly books on the Philippines.

 

Massapequa was where he and my mother started the Cellar Book Shop (ABAA). It was located in the basement of our house at 383 Forrest Avenue, hence the “Cellar” designation; and so began their fifty year career as specialists in the Philippines and South East Asia.

 

My father, Morton Jacob “Jock” Netzorg (MJN), was a phenomenal bookman, poker player, and teller of jokes. He was a book buyer without peer. He bought (and bought). He cataloged and wrote the blurbs. To his already massive knowledge of literature, poetry, history, classics, romance languages, philosophy, mathematics and shaggy dog stories he added his own particular love of the Philippines, his home land.

 

A native of Naga City in Bico, he was born in 1912, the son of American school teacher parents. The family later moved to Manila; for the rest of his life he was a permanent Manila boy in his heart. As a young man he worked as a stevedore on the docks of that city. Despite his ample charm when sufficiently annoyed he had a hot temper and a vocabulary to match.

 

My mother, Petra F. Netzorg (PFN or “Pete” to almost everyone else), took the books that Jock deposited in the stairwells, on the floor, on the dining room table, in the bathrooms, in the basement and all other available surfaces in numbers that seemed to increase exponentially by the day and she sold them.

 

While my dad seemed to read almost everything that passed through his hands (even today I find examples of his neat hand writing penciled in the margins of books he gave me), I seldom saw my mother crack a book.

 

To her books were objects to be shelved, invoiced, sold, and shipped. Though the Cellar Book Shop (CBS) seldom employed more than four full time workers at any given moment, she ran it as if it were General Motors.

 

My mother, a Jewish refugee from Berlin, was a woman with a mind-of-her-own. The Cellar Book Shop was her baby and enter her office or her basement or her packing room and by God and you were going to do things her way, which was the right way, nay the only way - down to the way you made the corners on the packages, licked the brown paper tape or typed the date on the invoice (using carbon paper and three onion skin carbons).

 

It was my mother who produced “Cellar Arrivals,” their by-subscription mimeographed list of “current and choice” acquisitions sent out at frequent intervals to those well-heeled customers who demanded the latest and greatest from the Netzorgs.

 

Even though the shop was technically in the basement, and even though there was a first floor and an upstairs, there was no such thing as an empty space, and every surface was piled high with books or catalogs, or packing supplies, or a sink soaking with the stamps for my father’s stamp collection, or invoices waiting to go out, or back issues of the Antiquarian Bookman (fondly remember by those of us now in the geezer generation as the AB).

 

My parents had two children. I was the eldest and my David brother came along three years later. From the time we could sit upright and hold a pencil and print letters we were pressed into service. So we couldn’t write so well, that didn’t mean we couldn’t erase the old price codes and put in new identifications lightly in pencil in the upper right hand corner of the front fly.

 

And a child who can print can certainly soon be taught to catalog, can learn to laboriously spell the name of the author, title, publisher, date, condition, number of pages, and size and write them on a “slip,” which is what we called those little 3” x 5” pieces of paper. Once a slip was produced it stayed in the CBS bookstore archives forever. Each slip recorded how many times a given title appeared and for what price it was purchased and sold and usually the buyer and seller too.

 

The Netzorgs did not have, perish the thought, an open shop. No we were “By Appointment Only,” and though we moved from Massapequa back to Detroit and in Detroit outgrew the basement and expanded to the second story over an African-American hair salon - all our sales were done by mail, be it catalog, by quotes, or via Cellar Arrivals to the worthy and erudite.

 

“By appointment” meant you wrote or called in advance. Under no circumstances did you just show up or drop by. It was generally better if you spoke with my father, because frankly, my mother was not too keen on actual live people potentially messing up her carefully organized stock or interrupting her well oiled book selling machine.

 

Where my father never met a book he didn’t like, my mother's forte was librarians and graduate students. She cultivated them the way other people have prize roses. They started with her as graduate students and they ended as professor emeritus and heads of special collections or the archives of great universities. Cornell and Yale were two names heard frequently around our dinner table.

 

In those days the meetings of the learned societies were the hunting grounds of book dealers and my mother, with her lists of librarians, her German efficiency and her remarkable memory for just who wanted just what, built her reputation on institutional sales and her life-long friendships with academics.

 

My father, on the other hand, kept his day job until retirement; he eventually became a management consultant at a Big Five accounting firm – the square peg in the round hole.

 

That in no way interfered with his proclivity for inviting people home for dinner whom he met in the elevators at Rockefeller Center. He also ran one of the liveliest stops on the Underground Railroad for Filipinos visiting the United States. I do not think there was ever a countryman who passed within a hundred miles of Massapequa or Detroit who did not end up down in the basement salivating at the treasures it contained or joining us for a meal.

 

My childhood memories are filled with the tinkle of ice cubes, the smell of cigarette smoke mixed with bourbon, the babble of a lot of grown up voices, and their legendary annual Fourth of July party. One of our family’s particular friends was the young artist Romeo V. Tabuena who drew the covers to most of the Cellar’s early catalogs. Tabuena went on to become one of the better known artists of the Philippines. But in those days he was a shy young art student eking out a living in NYC and riding the train out to Massapequa for corn-on-the-cob.

 

(Another well remembered person - who shall remain nameless, was the gentleman who came home with my dad, ate a hearty dinner - and stole his overcoat on the way out.)

 

The parts I loved about being a dealer’s daughter were accompanying my father on his forays into the countryside, especially in the 50s where his ratty haunts were filled with raunchy comics and other material totally unsuitable for the young adult reader. I of course also liked having a father who had pre-read everything so that no subject could be mentioned (however casually) that my dad did not know exactly what should be read next. Nine times out of ten it was already in the basement.

 

Talk about spoiled I was (and am) spoiled for life.

 

The not-so-good parts were the dungeon of the packing room (where my mother also stored her home preserved pickles - so it always smelled of vinegar), cranking the mimeograph and getting that ghastly purple ink all over my hands, face and clothes. I confess to being less than fond of the post office.

 

I worked at the shop in high school and some of my classmates at Detroit’s Mumford High were also Cellar Book employees. We formed a short-lived union (ruthlessly quashed by management). Our rallying song was “Ay Ay Kali Sud” (Oh How Hard Life Is) and no, we never got so much as a dime raise.

 

For those of you out in book-land, the children of dealers who wonder as you are hauled from pillar to post if there is any payoff to this involuntary servitude, let me assure you that as strange as it seems it all came in handy. And once you learn it you can not forget it.

 

I can indeed pack anything and pack it to a very high standard. That is not as good as my brother David, who achieved Hall of Fame status, but my packages can and do survive both trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic journeys.

 

The training received at Cellar Book got me other jobs and plenty of them including the Archives of American Art, the Rare Book Room at the University of California at Berkeley, the New York Times Art Department and the The Folklore Center in New York City to name a few.

 

In 1979 I started my own company (which I had the nerve to name Cellar Book West). That particular affectionate gesture lasted less than a New York minute (Direct quote from PFN – “That is ‘our name’ get your own name.”)

 

So I called it Prints Pacific, specializing in Hawaii and the Pacific and it’s been going ever since and it’s been a bumpy road at best. At the very beginning I sent my father a copy of my first catalog. He carefully marked it up very lightly in pencil pointing out the spelling, punctuation and grammatical errors appearing in nearly every listing then sent it back to me. Fortunately, the customers weren’t nearly as picky and it rapidly sold out. I’d love to have any of those things back again.

 

Now it is 2014, and I’m still (however marginally) in the book business. Who knew?

 

Just so you should have something more tangible than nostalgia after reading this story, here’s how to code your stock so you can remember your buying price. A little gimmick I learned about the age of five.

 

Pick any word with ten different letters, for example:

 

A F T E R S H O C K

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0

 

A book bought for $4.50 would be coded Erk; while another purchased for

$75 code would be HR

 

In conclusion, here are two useful precepts I’ll pass along from my parents:

 

My father’s favorite motto in mock Latin was "Illegitimis non carborundum” - Don’t let the bastards grind you down. While for as long as I can remember the sign over my mother’s desk read: “Bookselling may not make you rich, but you will have a rich life.”

 

And, lo these many years later, they’re both absolutely true.

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Sep. 22:</b> CORONELLI, Vincenzo (1650-1718) - <i>Atlante Veneto.</i> Venezia: Domenico Padovani, 1690. €15,000 to €20,000.
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Sep. 22:</b> [CANALETTO] - VISENTINI, Antonio; da Giovanni Antonio CANAL (detto 'Il Canaletto'). - <i>Urbis Venetiarum prospectus celebriores.</i> Venezia, 1754. €12,000 to €18,000.
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Sep. 22:</b> RAMELLI, Agostino - <i>Le diverse et artificiose machine nelle quali si contengono uarij et artificiosi mouimenti…</i> Paris: presso l'autore, 1588. €6,000 to €9,000.
    <b>Il Ponte Casa d’Aste, Sep. 22:</b> <i>Anthologia Graeca Planudea [in grego]</i> - Edita da: Janus Lascaris (1445-1535). Firenze: Lorenzo di Francesco de Alopa, 11 Agosto 1494. €10,000 to €15,000.
  • <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>A further selection of<br>16th and 17th century English books from the Fox Pointe Manor Library<br>24 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Locke (John). <i>An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding in Four Books,</i> first edition, second issue, 1690. £12,000 to £18,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Plutarch. <i>The lives of the noble Grecians and Romanes, compared together by that graue learned philosopher and historiographer, Plutarke of Chæronea,</i> first edition of this translation, 1579. £8,000 to £12,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> [Allott (Robert, editor)]. <i>Wits Theater of the little World,</i> first edition, 1599. £5,000 to £7,000.
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>A further selection of 16th and 17th century English books<br>from the Fox Pointe Manor Library<br>24 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Execution of Quakers in Boston.- Stephenson (Marmaduke). <i>A Call from Death to Life,</i> first edition, 1660. £4,000 to £6,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Boyle (Robert). <i>The sceptical chymist: or Chymico-physical doubts & paradoxes…,</i> 2 parts in 1 vol., second edition, 1680. £3,500 to £4,500.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Atlases.- Morden (Robert). <i>[Geography Rectified: or, A Description of the World],</i> [c.1688]. £3,000 to £4,000.
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>A further selection of 16th and 17th century English books<br>from the Fox Pointe Manor Library<br>24 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Bread.- Penkethman (John). <i>Artachthos or a New Booke declaring the Assise or Weight of Bread,</i> 1638. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Anatomy.- Collins (Samuel). <i>A Systeme of Anatomy, treating of the Body of Man, Beasts, Birds, Fish, Insects, and Plants,</i> 2 vol., first edition, 1685. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Wine.- [Ames (Richard)]. <i>The Bacchanalian Sessions; or The Conten' tion of Liquors: With a Farewel to Wine,</i> first edition, 1693. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <center><b>Forum Auctions<br>A further selection of 16th and 17th century English books<br>from the Fox Pointe Manor Library<br>24 September 2020</b>
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Witchcraft.- Bekker (Balthasar). <i>The World Bewitch'd; or, An Examination of the Common Opinions Concerning Spirits,</i> vol. 1 (all published), first English edition, 1695. £2,000 to £3,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Great Plague and Great Fire of London prophesied.- Lilly (William). <i>Monarchy or No Monarchy in England,</i> first edition, 1651. £1,500 to £2,000.
    <b>Forum Auctions, Sep. 24:</b> Swimming.- Thevenot (Melchisédec). <i>The Art of Swimming. Illustrated by Proper Figures. With Advice for Bathing,</i> first edition in English, 1699. £1,500 to £2,000.
  • <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Selections from the Library of<br>Gerald and Barbara Weiner<br>Live and Online<br>October 8, 2020 / 10am CT</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> DARWIN, Charles Robert. <i>On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection.</i> London: W. Clowes and Sons for John Murray, 1859. [With] autograph note signed. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> [FINE PRESS & LIVRE D'ARTISTE]. -- [KELMSCOTT PRESS]. CHAUCER, Geoffrey. <i>The Works ... now newly imprinted.</i> Edited by F.S. Ellis. Hammersmith: Kelmscott Press, 1896. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> LAWRENCE, Thomas Edward. <i>Seven Pillars of Wisdom, a triumph.</i> [London: Privately Printed], 1926. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Selections from the Library of<br>Gerald and Barbara Weiner<br>Live and Online<br>October 8, 2020 / 10am CT</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> SHAKESPEARE, William. <i>Mr. William Shakespear's Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies…</i> London, Printed for H. Herringman, E. Brewster, R. Chiswell, and R. Bentley, 1685. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> AUDUBON, John James. <i>The Birds of America…</i> [1839-] 1840-1844. -- AUDUBON, John James and John BACHMAN. <i>The Quadrupeds of North America.</i> 1849-1854. $60,000 to $80,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> OGILBY, John, trans. [MONTANUS, Arnoldus]. <i>America: being the latest, and most Accurate Description of the New World…</i> London: Printed by the Author, 1671. $30,000 to $40,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Selections from the Library of<br>Gerald and Barbara Weiner<br>Live and Online<br>October 8, 2020 / 10am CT</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> HOBBES, Thomas. <i>Leviathan, or The Matter, Forme, & Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civill.</i> London: printed for Andrew Crooke, 1651. $20,000 to $30,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> BLACKWELL, Elizabeth. <i>A Curious Herbal, containing Five Hundred Cuts of the most useful Plant which are now used in the Practice of Physick…</i> London: John Nourse, 1739. $15,000 to $20,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> MILTON, John. <i>Paradise Lost.</i> London: Printed by S. Simmons ... to be sold by T. Helder, 1669. $12,000 to $18,000.
    <center><b>Hindman Auctions<br>Selections from the Library of<br>Gerald and Barbara Weiner<br>Live and Online<br>October 8, 2020 / 10am CT</b>
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> MALCOLM X. Typed letter signed ("Malcolm X"), to Alex Haley. Cairo, Egypt, 18 September 1964. " 1 page, 8vo. $6,000 to $8,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> TOLKIEN, John Ronald Reuel. Autograph letter signed (“JRRT”). To George Sayer, Oxford, 7 August 1952. 2 pages, 8vo, creased; morocco folding case. $4,000 to $6,000.
    <b>Hindman Auctions, Oct. 8:</b> WRIGHT, Frank Lloyd. Autograph manuscript signed ("Frank Lloyd Wright"), entitled "To the Countryside." N.p. [Taliesin?], [June 1926]. 2 pages, 4to, creased. $4,000 to $6,000.

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